To the New York Times:

We stand with the Black journalists and Black employees calling for change within your company.

As the paper of record with the ability to shift the public’s consciousness at a national and global level, the New York Times has upheld and reinforced anti-Blackness and white supremacy in the United States and abroad for over 160 years.

The 2020 racial-justice uprisings have underscored the need to shift power and build journalism that will expose and eradicate white supremacy in pursuit of human dignity for all. Building that future starts with recognizing and repairing the abuses taking place within the halls of your organization.

Publicly stand with — and meet the demands of — Black staff at the New York Times.

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    Stand with Black journalists and Black employees at the New York Times.

    Tell the New York Times: Meet the Demands of Your Black Journalists and Black Employees

    Tell the New York Times: Meet the Demands of Your Black Journalists and Black Employees

    Major news and media organizations like the New York Times, Philadelphia Inquirer and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette are undergoing a long-overdue public reckoning with anti-Black racism within their operations.

    This is thanks to the racial-justice uprisings taking place across the world and the brave journalists of color publicly speaking out against internal structures that uphold white supremacy.

    The U.S. media system has historically functioned as an arm of the broader system of racial oppression in this country.1 And as the paper of record, the New York Times has held a unique and powerful place in upholding and reinforcing anti-Blackness and white supremacy in the United States and abroad for over 160 years.

    But we can shift power and build journalism that will expose and eradicate white supremacy. We can have journalism that centers impacted voices and addresses community-information needs instead of favoring privileged populations that support the status quo.

    The winds of change have been blowing for decades, and those who’ve maintained the status quo need to step up. Stand with Black journalists and Black employees at the New York Times who are bravely calling for much-needed change.


    1. “The Colonial Roots of Media’s Racial Narratives,” Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, Feb. 1, 2012